Trade Agreement Goal

3 On the road to government implementation, creating sufficient resources to achieve these ambitious goals will clearly be a major challenge. In the absence of a new specific financial commitment for implementation under the ffD outcome, international trade, as a catalyst for growth and job creation, should play a key role in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. Under the SDGs, trade is not seen as an end in itself, but as a means to support implementation. While governments have already identified broad avenues through which trade policy could contribute to the development agenda on the 2030 agenda, a more detailed approach to implementation remains elusive. Recognizing this reality, the FFD document invites the General Council of the World Trade Organization (WTO) to “examine how the WTO can contribute to sustainable development”. 54THE FAO State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture 2014 provides an overview of trade in fishery products, one of the most intense of all food products. In 2012, world trade in fishery products amounted to nearly $130 billion, of which 54% was for developing countries. Fishing generates more income for developing countries than many other agricultural raw materials, including coffee, natural rubber, cocoa and bananas. While developing countries with particular strengths in the processing of fishery products such as China and Thailand are among the world`s largest exporters of fish, official statistics often underestimate the significant regional trade in fishery products, particularly in Africa, Asia and Central America. 28 In the United States, agricultural expenditure is concentrated on domestic food aid under the Supplementary Nutrition Assistance Programme (SNAP), also known as food brands – a relatively undisputed programme from a trade-distorting point of view. However, a new agriculture law removed direct payments to farmers considered green boxes under WTO rules, as they were difficult to justify in a relatively high price environment, and replaced them with new subsidized insurance schemes that protect farmers from yield risks and price fluctuations.

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